Whole wheat blueberry rolls

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Long time no blogging. I know. Seriously a long time. And I can´t really blame life of getting in the way or something like that, as I´m ending my 2-months long summer holiday with no job, no – or very little studying and not really any good summer-weather either, “forcing” me outside… So there should have been plenty of opportunities to bake, cook and blog, but too much time makes me lazy… What can I say? The less I do, the less I….do. But now I´m back! Because I´ve really actually cooked and baked and eaten a lot of good food this summer, so I guess I ought to share some of it, and not keep it all to myself!

The last weeks, when there was several days in a row without rain (yeah, I know) I packed my blueberry-picker and went hunting. (Appearantly the picker is a somewhat Norwegian, or maybe scandinavian? thing, because it really attracts tourists!) I´ve had heard that the blueberry season was started, and some friends had already been having good luck finding berries, so I was pretty optimistic. But I have to say I was a little disappointed. There weren´t as many as previous years, and besides, they were small, but I thought to myself that a cold summer with a slow ripening process would produce even better berries, as the case is for strawberries. It wasn´t until some old ladies came along and spotted me and my picker in the woods, who also noticed the small size of the berries and claimed that they weren´t sweet, that I actually took a berry-tasting-test. I thought they might have said it to scare me off and have the berries to themselves, but they were right. The blueberries weren´t really sweet. Bummer. But I finished the surrounding blueberry bushes and started to walk home. On my way I came to talk with another guy curious about the berry situation, who asked about ripeness, size and flavour. When I said that they were pretty small and also a little sour, he said “Well, then it´s almost a complete waste of time!” And I wondered, was it? Did I spend so many hours for nothing? I would prove him wrong! These blueberries maybe aren´t the best for snacking, but put into baked goods in companionship with sugar and butter, that would probably make up for it! I made some jam right away, which was lovely, but now, it´s time to do some baking, I figured! Today I invited a friend over for coffee and something home-baked, so I figured it was a nice opportunity to use some of the berries. I finally made a decision on what to bake (my first intention was a blueberry bundt cake, eventually a pie – but as there was just the two of us, I figured it would be better with something in a serving size that also could be frozen) and landed on these blueberry rolls.

I was a little short of time, so I tweaked my single-rising yeast recipe, and adapted it to a more suitable number of rolls. I substituted most of the wheat with whole wheat, and used fresh blueberries, butter, sugar and marcipan for the filling. They turned out delicious! A little burned, but still good!

Whole wheat blueberry rolls

  • Prep time: 1 hour and 30 minutes (or more if you have the time)
  • Cooking time: 15 minutes
  • Total time: 2 hours

Ingredients – makes 12 rolls

  • 2 dl milk
  • 100 g butter
  • 100 g powered sugar (which I replaced with regular sugar)
  • 30 g fresh yeast
  • 1/2 tsp cardamom powder
  • 500 g flour (I used about 3/4 whole wheat, and 1/4 regular wheat)
  • 2 dl blueberries
  • 50 g sugar
  • 50 g butter
  • 50 g marcipan

Instructions:

Bring milk, sugar and butter to a boil in a large pan. Remove from heat and allow to cool until it reaches a lukewarm temperature. You can speed up the cooling-down process by putting the pan in the zink filled with cold water. Add the yeast into the mixture, and stir in cardamom and the flour. (If the pan isn´t big enough, simply pour the milk-mixture into another bowl, and then add the flour) Knead the dough into an elastic large ball, using your hands dusted lightly with flour. (If you have them time, put the dough in a covered bowl, and let rise in a warm place about 1 hour or until the dough has doubled in size – but the original recipe actually skips this point!)

Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celcius. Roll the risen/or unrisen dough out on a lightly floured surface, until it is approx 30×40 cm long and 1/2 cm thick. (The thinner you get it, the more area you have for filling, so that might have to be adjusted up or down accordingly if you roll it thicker or thinner)
To make filling, combine all ingredients in a bowl, mashing the berries slightly.
Spread the filling evenly over the surface of the dough.

(Whereever you go from here, is entirely up to you, whether you want to roll them like a cinnamon roll, or make them something like mine. I won´t say how I my rolls got their look, cause I did it wrong (again) and it turned out quite messy… If you´re like me, and cannot figure out the twisting, here´s an instruction video: How to twist a cinnamon-roll, or else, here´s how it goes)

Now fold a third of the dough towards the middle, and fold the other third over the first one, so you have 3 layers of dough. Cut the dough into 12-15 strips about 2 cm wide. Twist each strip until the dough stretches 20 cm long. Twist it around to shape it into a snail shell (roll) tugging the end of the dough under the roll Place the buns on a baking sheet covered with baking paper, with the twists facing upwards. Cover and let them rise to reach the double size for approximately 1 hour. Sprinkle the buns with sugar and chopped almonds. Bake them on 200 C for about 12-14 minutes or till they turn golden. Cool on a rack, or enjoy immediately, when they´re still warm and the filling is gooey…

Perfect to break apart and eat it bit by bit, making room for a zip of black coffee in between the bites! I love to eat them like that, getting a feeling of all the different textures and flavors. And the berries were perfect in these rolls! The buns turned out sweet and buttery, hearthy and filling because of the whole wheat, and the marcipan gave a lovely almondy flavour! I knew the berry picking wasn´t a waste!

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Rhubarb Soup – the perfect summer dessert

My dessert repertoar often evolves around cake, chocolate, apples, ice cream or something like that. Not so often fresh and fruity things. More heavy stuff for this girl. That beeing said, I appreciate any kind of dessert. I just don’t make that much different stuff at home, for myself. But now that me and the boyfriend plus my sister and hers have started our 3-courses dinner parties, it’s for reasons like this. To challenge ourselves, and try out new recipes. To try out things we don’t usually make. I was in charge of the menu for our last dinner, and decided on this soup for dessert. Of course, I decide on dessert first, and then plan the rest of the menu… I had some rhubarb in the fridge, the strawberries were at it’s peak, and it was time to reunite with dessert soup. I remember my grandmother used to make this soup which was basically thickened syrup with raisins. And I loved it! And that’s pretty much my only experience (at least my only memory) of dessert soups. So, this soup really passed my expectations, you can say. This is quite a step up from the syrup-soup. (Sorry grandma!) But in her defense, this is created by one of Norway’s best pastry chefs. This is quality all the way. I never thought any soup could be so good. So if you think dessert soups are for grannys only, think again. Me and soup have reunited, and so can you! Trust me, you will. And please don’t judge it by it’s ugly apperance, it wasn’t really photogenic, but you can hold that against anything so delicious.

I had to make this again, cause I forgot to bring my camera to my sister’s house. Well, that’s not the only reason. I needed another bowl of this stuff. But I didn’t find strawberries at the supermarket, so I replaced them with raspberries. Worked out fine, but I think I prefer strawberries.

Rhubarb Soup
500 g red rhubarb
250 g sugar
7.5 dl water
1 vanilla pod
10 g/1 tablespoon maizena
0.5 dl cold water
500 g strawberries

Wash the rhubarb and cut into 2 cm pieces-
Put sugar, rhubarb and water in a kettle and allow to boil without stirring. Turn down the heat, and let it simmer for 30 minutes.
Drain the rhubarb syrup over another kettle, and throw away the rhubarb. Cut the vanilla pod in half and scrape out the seeds. Put the seeds and the pod into the rhubarb syrup, and let it simmer for a couple of minutes. Stir the maizena into 0.5 dl of cold water, and pour this into the rhubarb soup. This will make the soup thicken. Let it boil for another minute. Turn off the heat, and let the soup cool in the fridge or the freezer. (This can easily be frozen down if you want) Remove the vanillapod before serving. Decorate with fresh strawberries and serve with mascarpone cream.

Mascarpone Cream
Seeds from 1 vanillapod
100 g mascarpone
2 dl heavy cream
50 g sugar
lemon juice

Mix everything but the lemon juice together. Whisk untill stiff, but be careful not to whisk too much, cause it will make the cream crack. Add lemon juice at your taste.